Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Guest”

Los Angeles Sheriff’s Dept Hunts Gunman Who Shot Two Deputies in Ambush Attack

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department was leading a hunt Sunday for a gunman who shot two deputies multiple times in an ambush Saturday night.

Both deputies were in critical condition, officials said.

The deputies, who worked in the department’s transit services bureau, were shot while sitting in their parked patrol vehicle near the Compton station of the Metro A Line, a light rail in Los Angeles. The gunman walked past the passenger side of the car shortly before 7 p.m., the officials said, then turned around and fired several rounds from a pistol into the vehicle. He then fled on foot, the officials said.


Read in The Wall Street Journal


Read and comment here on The Red Line

Democrat governors ignore huge threat to NJ, CT and IL

In July, Connecticut state government employees received a 5.5 percent combined pay increase on the backs of taxpayers while hundreds of thousands of people across the state remained unemployed. That’s clearly not right. Democrats insisted the governor could not do anything about it, despite the state of emergency, because the raises were part of a collective bargaining agreement.

It does not bode well for Connecticut taxpayers that our elected officials refused to even try to delay raises for their own employees at the height of a crisis. The choices for fiscally strapped states like Connecticut, Illinois and New Jersey will only get harder over the next few years.

Here is the dilemma: These three states have committed to unsustainable pension, insurance and debt obligations at the behest of the special interests. And while New York state’s pension is currently well-funded because of its high taxes, it could also face trouble meeting its contractual obligations if the post-pandemic exodus from the city keeps growing.


Read in NY Post


Read and comment here on The Red Line

Progressive district attorneys are undermining the law

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/SF-DA-Chesa-Boudin.jpg"

One reason for the surging, often protracted violence in US cities is the rise of a host of progressive prosecutors who actually tilt against law and order.

The trend is most glaring in places known for their kooky left-wing politics, like Portland and San Francisco, but extreme leftists have also taken over as district attorneys in cities like Chicago and Boston. Many owe big thanks for their elections to funding from far-left fatcat George Soros.

In Portland, violent “protests” have dragged on for months, thanks to the idiocy of Mayor Ted Wheeler, who let hoodlums drive him out of his own condo — but also to Multnomah County DA Mike Schmidt, who dropped charges against hundreds of people arrested for offenses like interfering with cops, disorderly conduct, criminal trespass and rioting. Schmidt also made it harder to prosecute assaults on cops.

In Contra County, Calif., outside San Francisco, DA Diana Becton will now consider looters’ “needs” when weighing criminal charges. At Politico, she and four other black, female DAs (from Chicago, Boston, St. Louis and Durham) actually slammed the very criminal-justice system they were elected to enforce — ludicrously claiming it was “constructed to control Black people and people of color” and that it’s now doing just that.


The Bay City’s DA is Chesa Boudin, the son of Brink’s robbery cop-killers who was raised by radical Weather Underground leaders Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn. He, too, has adopted rules making it harder to prosecute suspects.


Read in NY Post


Read and comment here on The Red Line

DC Mayor Muriel Bowser fears ‘race war.’ Blames ‘outside agitators.’

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Muriel-Bowser.jpg"

The mayor of Washington, DC, said she fears a “race war” is brewing — blaming “outside agitators” who come “armed for battle.”

Mayor Muriel Bowser said there was a “stark contrast” when outside militants disrupted peaceful protests, with police revealing that more than 70 percent of those arrested in recent days were from outside the district


Read in New York Post

Read and comment here on The Red Line

The Myth of Systemic Police Racism

Hold officers accountable who use excessive force. But there’s no evidence of widespread racial bias.

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Protesters-Kneeling-in-Front-of-Police.jpg"

George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis has revived the Obama-era narrative that law enforcement is endemically racist.

This charge of systemic police bias was wrong during the Obama years and remains so today. However sickening the video of Floyd’s arrest, it isn’t representative of the 375 million annual contacts that police officers have with civilians. A solid body of evidence finds no structural bias in the criminal-justice system with regard to arrests, prosecution or sentencing. Crime and suspect behavior, not race, determine most police actions.

In 2019 police officers fatally shot 1,004 people, most of whom were armed or otherwise dangerous. African-Americans were about a quarter of those killed by cops last year (235), a ratio that has remained stable since 2015. That share of black victims is less than what the black crime rate would predict, since police shootings are a function of how often officers encounter armed and violent suspects. In 2018, the latest year for which such data have been published, African-Americans made up 53% of known homicide offenders in the U.S. and commit about 60% of robberies, though they are 13% of the population.


Read in The Wall Street Journal


Read and comment here on The Red Line

It’s now basically Donald Trump vs. Kamala Harris for president

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Kamala-Harris-2.jpg"

Considering Joe Biden’s age — and endless fumbling — the selection of a vice president has never been more important. Heck, even many Democrats aren’t so sure Biden is going to finish his first term. So the question now is: Do you want a President Harris?

Read in New York Post

Read and comment here on The Red Line

Profile in Courage

Democrat, Cop Commissioner, Ex-Cop Bucks His Party on CT Police Reform Bill

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Raynond-G.-Baldwin-Jr..jpg"

TRUMBULL — The chairman of Trumbull’s Police Commission has come out against a legislative attempt to reform Connecticut’s policing, and opposing what he termed the “knee-jerk” nature of current legislative efforts.

Former First Selectman Raymond Baldwin Jr., who also spent 14 years as an officer in the Trumbull Police Department, wrote to Trumbull’s legislative delegation Saturday, a day after the state General Assembly’s Judiciary Committee held a 13-hour listening session on the proposed legislation, LCO 3471.

“I wish to express my serious concern about legislation being proposed in the Connecticut State Legislature which I believe will greatly impede our police officers’ ability to protect, not only our citizens, but our officers themselves,” Baldwin wrote. “These proposed measures will also make recruitment of new officers and the retention of currently employed ones extremely difficult.”

Read in CT Post


Read and comment here on The Red Line

Rep. Themis Klarides: Lamont can still stop pay raises for CT employees

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Themis-Klarides.jpeg"

It may seem odd, but Gov. Ned Lamont and I agree on something, that the raises for state employees that went into effect on July 1 should have been delayed. Weeks ago in a letter to the governor we asked him to use his authority to delay the raises. Unfortunately, but not surprisingly, on June 9, Governor Lamont reported that the State Employees Bargaining Coalition had rejected his calls to put off raises, and he was powerless to do anything about it. This is where our agreement ends.

While more than 600,000 of our friends and neighbors have been forced to file for unemployment benefits as a result of the devastation caused by COVID-19 in Connecticut, the governor claims to be powerless to stop the second installment of 5.5 percent pay raises for state employees, the first of which was paid out last year. Simply put, the stakes are too high for his weakness and hand-wringing.

By executive order, utilizing his emergency powers, Governor Lamont had no trouble doing what he felt was right, making numerous decisions including, among other things, the decision to close thousands of Connecticut small and local businesses, closing houses of worship and giving undocumented immigrants $3 million in assistance. Yet despite these extraordinary steps, the governor has been unable to find a way to break away from the backroom deal negotiated with powerful government employee unions by his predecessor, Gov. Dan Malloy, and rubber-stamped by the Democrat majority in the State Legislature.

As leaders, it is our job to find a way to do the most difficult things. Governors of New York, California, Virginia and Pennsylvania, all Democrats, have all made decisions to adjust state employee compensation in light of the incredible crisis our respective states are facing. Governor Lamont should do likewise. State law allows for both the governor and the legislature to amend existing contracts if certain conditions exist, including overriding public health and safety concerns or if it is in the best interests of the public. Given that we are facing an estimated $2 billion deficit next year it is clearly in the state’s best interest to at least delay the raises for three months. That would give our budget experts the time to better assess our financial health.

In 2017 Attorney General George Jepsen indicated that in the most extreme circumstances, the state could take action to amend existing labor contracts. Governor Lamont has demonstrated his willingness to use his authority to exact sweeping changes that have affected the lives and livelihood of every single resident, family and business in Connecticut during this crisis. The governor has asked a lot from the people of Connecticut. He also asked stated employees to help and, unfortunately, their union said “No.” And because he counts on organized labor for his election, he basically replied “OK, thanks so much; sorry to bother you.” Where there is a will, there is a way.

Delay the raises, force the unions to sue you in court or meet you at the bargaining table. I, my fellow Republicans, and more than a few Democrats will charge with you up that hill. I believe the circumstances have never been more dire, as our state has been confronted with a global pandemic that has taken the lives and livelihood of our friends and neighbors. The governor must act.

Read in Stamford Advocate

Read and comment here on The Red Line

Teachers’ unions balk at reopening schools, hurting country

By bipartisan consensus, education is a high, or the highest, priority, so why aren't teachers considered essential workers?

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/empty-high-school-hallway.jpg"

If grocery store clerks, UPS workers, bus drivers, police officers, sanitation engineers, oilfield hands and people who work in meat processing plants are essential workers, why aren’t teachers?

As the pandemic invaded one community after another, millions of brave souls went to work every day, often putting their lives at risk, to keep Americans fed, warm and safe. Thousands of doctors, emergency medical teams, nurses and firemen knowingly exposed themselves to sick patients; many became ill themselves. The heroism of these people, confronting a little-understood disease, cannot be overstated.

Now our nation urgently needs our children to go back to school, for the good of our youngsters and working families. But public-school teachers are balking. Instead of working with officials to facilitate reentry, they are requiring exorbitant safety measures that make returning to the classroom all but impossible.

Some are making demands that have nothing to do with health precautions, but rather target Democratic political priorities, like defunding the police.

For instance, United Teachers Los Angeles released a paper decrying “our profoundly racist, intensely unequal society” and stating that “Police violence is a leading cause of death and trauma for Black people… We must shift the astronomical amount of money devoted to policing to education and other essential needs…”

For good measure, the Bernie Sanders-style polemic also calls for “Medicare for All” and insists on a moratorium on charter schools.

Read in The Hill


Read and comment here on The Red Line

NY Times Editor Resigns in Protest at NYT’s “New McCarthyism”

"at this paper, the truth isn’t a process of collective discovery, but an orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else."

<img src="https://www.the-red-line.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/NYT-Image.png"

Dear A.G. [Sulzberger, Publisher] - It is with sadness that I write to tell you that I am resigning from The New York Times. I was hired with the goal of bringing in voices that would not otherwise appear in your pages... The reason for this effort was clear: The paper’s failure to anticipate the outcome of the 2016 election meant that it didn’t have a firm grasp of the country it covers... But the lessons that ought to have followed the election—lessons about the importance of understanding other Americans... and the centrality of the free exchange of ideas to a democratic society—have not been learned. Instead, a new consensus has emerged in the press, but perhaps especially at this paper: that truth isn’t a process of collective discovery, but an orthodoxy already known to an enlightened few whose job is to inform everyone else.


Read on the author's website


Read and comment here on The Red Line

Sign Up For Weekly Alerts

There will be a new Featured Column every week to 10 days. Sign up to receive an email alert when it posts. In the meantime, please visit The Red Line to see a new Column of the Day every day.